Chapter 6 : The Surgeon

“you know how you hear of young people just dropping dead? Well this is why!”

One day a letter arrived in the post from the hospital, I was getting used to these by now but this one was unlike any I’d had before.

As I read through the opening paragraph the words ‘bicuspid aortic valve with severely dilated left ventricle and regurgitation’ jump out the page at me. I carried on reading to see that a meeting with the surgeon would be ‘soon’. What did that mean? It didn’t make sense to me, what were they talking about and what did ‘soon’ mean?

The letter went on to mention that the size of my heart was a major factor in the decision to operate as it was now larger than what they considered to be a normal safe size.

I didn’t know how to come to terms with this information, I still didn’t really know what was going on. It was now obvious none of the tests had brought back good results and it became clear that it was a major problem.

The next day another letter arrived. I sat down and opened the envelope as if I was going through the same routine, although I felt nervous. What would this letter reveal after the shock of yesterday’s news. I started reading and found that a date was set to meet the surgeon to discuss options. It appeared ‘soon’ was in fact ‘very soon’.

I made my way to St. Bart’s Hospital in central London. It was an old building with big stone walls at its flanks and a courtyard in the centre adding to the grand feeling of the place. It was like an old relic of the British Empire standing tall and mighty in a fast moving and developing city.

Barts
Barts

I had been here once for an examination and as I had done so many times before at other hospitals I navigated through endless corridors to find the level, and then the room, that I need.

The waiting room had an old musky smell and feel to it. The decor didn’t seem to have changed since the sixties. The walls were a dull, pale brown. The seats were large with faded pink plastic covers and there were two large tall windows with a view straight out onto a wall. The air was thick with sad and bad news.

I settled in a seat hoping I wouldn’t be there for long and played on my phone. The room felt like the embodiment of depression, and I felt the occasional glance from the other people waiting. They were old and seemed inquisitive about why I was there, sitting on my own in the corner.

I didn’t wait long before I was called into a room where I was introduced to Dr Li and Nurse Emma.

The room was small and narrow with a bed on one side. It was in stark contrast to the grand exterior of the building. Dr Li was directly opposite me and Emma to my left as I sat down.

Dr Li introduced himself as the surgeon and quickly went into the results from all the tests, saying they needed to operate and remove my aortic valve as its was not working due to a defect, so open heart surgery needed to take place. He came across as a firm decisive man with a strong presence in the room.

He went on to briefly explain that I needed to make a decision on the type of operation they would perform. The valve could be replaced with either a mechanical titanium valve or a tissue valve. If I chose the mechanical valve I would need to be on a drug called Warfarin for the rest of my life and the valve would ‘outlast’ me, whereas if I decided on the tissue valve it was not certain how long it would last and so they would need to do the whole procedure again, facing the same decision further down the line.

The difference with a second open heart surgery operation is that I would be less likely to make it through due to the trauma. This all rolled off his tongue like he was reciting it for the thousandth time and it was all perfectly normal.

He then explained that Emma would be my one-on-one twenty-hour nurse throughout the process. I could call her at any time to ask questions. She would see me a few more times for various tests and help prepare for the operation. Despite the dominance of Dr Li in the room with his authoritarian knowledge, Emma added her own subtle presence which I felt strongly. She was a soft and gentle soul who sat patiently in the corner.

“Oh. Right OK…” was all that I managed to say.

He asked if I had any questions. In a confused and nervous state I said, “have you done this many times before?”

In a quick unfaltering way he chuckled to himself and told me he has been doing it for many years.

“There is lots of information about me and the procedures online. It would be best to check it all out and then come to a decision.” Pausing for a moment he continued; “we want to get you in in eight weeks’ time.”

This final sentence felt like he was putting an end to it and the matter had been dealt with. It was time to move on, ‘pack your bags and get on with it lad’.

The first thought I had was of my parents who I knew where arriving back from a holiday on that date so I naively asked, “can we move it?”

He gave me a surprised look. I could sense his disbelief at requesting the date be put back.

“How about the following week?” he said.

“Ok thanks,” and it was done, the date was set.

I asked if there is anything I should be doing or not doing. By now it seemed he felt the need to impress the seriousness of what was going on and calmly said, “you know how you hear of young people just dropping dead? Well this is why.” A sudden weight of air slammed down on me and it became very real.

I realised then I should stop riding my bike and do everything I could to help ease my heart on any level.

The meeting took no longer than fifteen minutes. It was quick and to the point which I appreciated, although shaken up by it. At last I had someone who was being upfront with me and had laid it bare in simple language; no covering up with medical terms or test results.

In a nutshell he explained, “your heart has had enough. It’s over stressed and we need to operate on you ASAP otherwise it will stop working, and that could be at any moment.”

I thanked them for their time and got up to leave in a haze. I walked down the corridor like I was gliding smoothly along, a few inches above the ground, sailing along on an air of uncertainty. People were moving around me and I was in the same space, although I felt like a distant shadow.

I unlocked my bike from the hospital railings and gently rode home.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s