Chapter 8 : Questions

“He provided true care and attention when it was needed, for which I am eternally grateful.”

 

After dwelling on all this and researching as much as I could, I decided to arrange a meeting at the hospital to see the surgeon again and ask the many questions which had now come to me, so I called through to the department to get an appointment.

It wasn’t the easiest of calls to make as it appears the surgeons are kept at a distance from their patients. Getting past the receptionist took some time but she eventually agreed to my request and booked me in.

I was all set to see Dr Li to get as much information out of him and clear all the confusion I had (at least I hoped so).

I went back to St. Bart’s and waited in the same depressing room, although this time the decor and atmosphere didn’t bother me. I felt enthused to be here and get the answers I so dearly wanted.

I was called through to meet with Dr Hall who was the surgeon’s right hand man. He would be in the operating theatre working alongside the surgeon. I was fine with that, I just wanted to see a professional face to face and talk to them.

Dr Hall was younger than the surgeon and very open to all my questions, even the ones challenging the current medical view. He admired that I had come back to ask so much and felt it was the right thing to do, saying “it’s important you are as comfortable and as clear as possible, so if I can help in anyway, that’s good!”

My main concern was over Warfarin and what do they mean it’s a ‘blood thinning agent’? I wondered how this would affect the circulation of blood around the body and whether the organs may be slightly starved of blood. The idea of a getting a simple cut and being at risk of a haemorrhage horrified me, surely that was just lunacy!

Dr Hall went on to explain that blood goes through various stages before it starts to clot, these are detections the body has in place which need to occur in order to start the process. Warfarin prevents a few of these stages from happening thus slowing the clotting process but not stopping it entirely. It does not ‘thin the blood,’ that is just an expression that people use. There is no damage to other organs through taking Warfarin as the blood consistency remains the same.

I had written down a series of questions, what ifs and all possible scenarios that I could think of. How life might be afterwards and what options or limitations there would be for me. As we discussed the questions and went into more and more detail the doctor/patient relationship seemed to have blurred a little. It felt more like a discussion between two friends, one sharing his new found curiosity over a subject and the other providing knowledge and wisdom. We were like two old men sitting in their armchairs nattering away.

Without thinking I suddenly asked: “which valve would you take?”

I hadn’t written the question down and had never thought to ask but I immediately felt the need to reassure him that I would not hold it against him and understood if was not at liberty to say due to professional commitments.

Looking at me he gently smiled and said: “that’s OK. I suggest the mechanical valve to prevent going through the operation again. You are young and this is a major consideration. That’s what I would do”.

He went on to say that for the very elderly they suggest the tissue valve as they are likely to die before the valve wears out. This would give them a better way of life for however long they had left.

As the meeting came to a close I felt clearer in my understanding of the procedures and the positives and negatives of each. I felt relieved to have answers to all my questions and a few more I wasn’t expecting. If it came down to it I didn’t have to make my mind up until the night before the operation.

We had a wonderful flowing conversation which went on for about an hour and a half. I felt so much better for seeing him and I think he did too. I could sense he was open to my concerns and wanted to reassure me, not only because it was his job but also simply because he was a fellow human being. He provided true care and attention when it was needed, for which I am eternally grateful.

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